Friday, September 18, 2009

Turning Over A New Leaf

Two new illustrations I drew this week which I'd like to share with you.

Take Flight
Pigmented drawing ink & Indian ink
250 gr paper; 20x20cm

Butterfly in Garden
Indian Ink
250gr paper; 20x20cm

Yes, I am glad that it's Friday and the weekend is looking good as in weather-wise! We are experiencing late summer temperatures but it feels more like spring than fall. Leaves are beginning to turn yellow-orange-brown, beautiful time of the year.

I have a new collection of glass beads which I call 'Turning over a new leaf' - the designs on the beads are quite like my illustrations and very motivated by the surrounding nature.

Turning Over A New Leaf #1
3.7cm long


Turning Over A New Leaf #1, another angle of bead


Turning Over A New Leaf #2
3.8cm long


Turning Over A New Leaf #2, another angle of bead


Turning Over A New Leaf #3
3.9cm long


Turning Over A New Leaf #4, another angle of bead


Turning Over A New Leaf #5
4.1cm long


Turning Over A New Leaf #5, another angle of bead


Turning Over A New Leaf #6
4.9cm long


Turning Over A New Leaf #6, another angle of bead


Turning Over A New Leaf #7
4.7cm long


Turning Over A New Leaf #7, another angle of bead


Turning Over A New Leaf #8
4.7cm


Turning Over A New Leaf #8, another angle of bead

The below bead is an Anna Karenina focal. Only made one such focal as I am fully into making the 'Turning Over A New Leaf' beads - you know how it is, I just have to get it out of my system plus it is likely here to stay for a while with me.

Winter Star
4.5cm

The below beads are what I made during the two-week workshop in Istanbul. These are the handful of beads which I kept for myself. The rest of the demo beads were distributed among my students.

Untitled
5.2cm long


Black Honey
4.9cm


Untitled
4.7cm long

Untitled, another angle of the previous bead


One of the students was Greek and was dating an Orthodox priest in Greece. Did you know that Orthodox priests may choose before their 'final vows' into priesthood whether they wish to marry or remain celibate? I didn't realize that till Istanbul. Anyway, Lina has asked me to show her how to make crucifixes and I decided to make them leaning towards the dark ages or Gothic scene than for religious reasons. I was told that they look macabre and creeping - yes, that's exactly how I wanted them to look like in the first place!

Crucifix with blue flower
5.1cm long

Crucifix with yellow flowers
5.7cm long
My favorite crucifix - notice if you will, how it tapers towards the bottom?

Crucifix with periwinkle flowers
5.2cm long

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

DISTRACTIONS ARE USEFUL

I'd probably mentioned it before, after each trip I usually am exhausted and need time to recuperate before I begin working in my studio (home studio, actually). It's been about two weeks since I return from Istanbul. Talking of which, I am lucky to have left the city and not be caught in the torrential rains and flooding in Istanbul - I feel awful for the people caught in the floods there.

I have been fiddling with our tax returns since my return and am glad that it's almost out of the way - only need to e-file and then, I'm done with the taxes (filing taxes is the most tedious activity since it's done once annually). On a lighter note, I started drawing again to distract myself from my visit to Glass Furnace - now, the last time I picked up a pen to draw was about 25 years ago; I thought I'd forgotten how to draw. I've done two illustrations in ink (Indian ink, to be exact - this ink is permanent). Yes, I admit, I went out immediately and bought a set of technical pens in different thickness!! It took me several hours to loosen up and begin drawing without worrying. The process of these illustrations involves sketching with pencil and then, using a technical pen (eg. Rotring) to go over the pencil drawing. Changes are sometimes made when I use the technical pen though the pencil drawing is pretty detailed itself. Here are two drawings I made last week.

Under The Sea
20x20cm, drawn on 250gram paper


The Garden
20x20cm, drawn on 250gram paper